Tag Archives: Therapeutic Pocketbook

“I knew that…” – but did you really?

The agonies of unlearning

The agonies of unlearning

I knew that…

This is something I and other IHM practitioners often hear, or see on people’s faces when we talk about homoeopathy to homoeopaths. I can feel the thought echoing through the ether (so to speak…) when I write about homoeopathy to homoeopaths.

However, to warp an old idiom, knowing is as knowing does. If you really knew that – why don’t you do that?

Let’s start with the first basic tenet of homoeopathy: like cures like. Continue reading

Book version of the P&W Boenninghausen Therapeutic Pocketbook

The IHM is releasing the English version of the P&W Boenninghausen TPB today. Retail Price is $85 + postage. The first 100 purchasers can obtain the book for $55+ postage.

63 books remaining at the $55 price. (26-October 2015 at 11:43 GMT.) Continue reading

Desire in Homoeopathy – a musing

shoulder injuryDesire in Homoeopathy – a musing

A recent sample case showed a patient who said he kept wanting to move – even though he knew it would hurt him. When and how should we use such symptoms?

In this case the patient had dislocated his shoulder. He stated a constant desire to move even though movement was painful for him. Continue reading

Boenninghausen and Treatment of Composite Fevers

Composite fevers are situations where there are all kinds of combinations of heat, cold, shivering, shuddering, perspiration – with each remedy ringing its own characteristic changes on what pattern it will produce.  Each pattern is so individual in each case of sickness, or where epidemic looms, that these composite fever patterns can often unlock cases, point directly to the best prescription and achieve cure.  It is essential in such cases to get very specific information about what comes first and what comes after – is it heat first then chill? Chill, then heat, then perspiration?

Here are some of the composite fever rubrics that appear in the Therapeutic Pocketbook.  Click on the image to see the rubrics more clearly.  The first number appearing after each rubric is the symptom number in the P&W, and the second number is the number of remedies in that rubric. Continue reading